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20121201
20121231
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English 34
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the arctic to climate change, and here the stark reminders of global warming are all around us, like these big cracks in the ice, cracks that shouldn't be this wide this early in the summer. my mom would not be happy about this. the arctic sea ice is literally disappearing beneath our feet. on track to be faster this year than any other on record. the effects of the rising temperatures up here are dramatic. just a few hundred miles away from us, these tourists had a narrow escape when an ice wave caused by a fallen glacier almost capsized their boat. despite all the obstacles and dangers this far north, we press on, and suddenly i notice some orange domes on the horizon. it's our campsite. we made it. welcome to the edge of the world, right? >> right. so this is our arctic base camp. >> reporter: i'm greeted by tom lenart. the only tour operator that offers land-based trips this far north. lesson number one for new arrivals, know what's beneath your feet. >> we're sitting on about four feet of sea ice with about a thousand feet of water below us. it appears like it's firm, but it is
and the person inside can already see us. >> they can see you. they can see what kind of mood you're in, if you're angry and assess it if you get in one more layer towards the building. >> reporter: the first set of locked doors only get you as far as the entryway. >> hi, welcome to middleton. >> reporter: the front desk then takes my i.d., scans it and performs an instant criminal background check using a system called raptor. the technology has already spread to 8,000 schools across the country. >> there you go. >> reporter: once cleared, i get this bright orange lanier that visitors must wear. there are cameras watching your every move. administrators can even pull up the cameras 24/7 on their smart phones. the superintendent and security consultant have invested more than $175,000 over the last two years beefing up security at the three schools in this tiny district in illinois. >> i don't know that there's too big a price tag to put on keeping your kids safe as they can absolutely be. >> reporter: while administrators admit there's no way of making the school 100% safe and immune to threat
us. calling my phone. >> if i were a mad man, how could i judge? >> reporter: hi, john, how are you? then, back in the u.s., we heard from him again. >> thank god, i'm in a place where there's some sanity. >> reporter: and finally, today, in guatemala city, a much calmer mcafee. you did not nor did any of your associates shoot him? >> for what reason? how stupid would it be? >> reporter: why don't you go to the police, talk to them, hash this all out? >> if only one-tenth of what i'm saying is true, i'm going to go in with a lawyer, things are going to be polite, they're going to say, ah, we're going to have to detain you. do you think the system of justice works in belize like it does in america? it does not. >> reporter: since his glory days in the '80s and '90s, pioneering that anti-virus sopt ware that still pops up on millions of computers, muck afee's journey has twisted and turned. in 2009, he lick by dated his assets, telling "nightline" -- >> it's been reported you are worth $100 million. >> that may have been true. >> reporter: then, he moved to belize and bought this seas
room by room with painstaking detail. using photos taken inside the school, they're creating a carbon copy of each classroom from what was on the walls, right down to the crayon left in the desk. exactly as it was friday when the school day was savagely cut short. but what if creating that exact environment only triggers the trauma again? >> it might for some kids. it might be a bit wedge. >> reporter: dr. jamie howard is a child psychologist who specializes in post traumatic stress. >> we do try to expose kids to triggers of the trauma because avoiding triggers or avoiding things that remind kids of trauma, and grown-ups, too, just serves to maintain the anxiety. >> reporter: they're ripping out toilets designed for middle schoolers and installing new bathrooms better suited for grade schoolers, hoping to reopen after winter break. why are they in such a hurry? >> it's really important to maintain routines as quickly as possible. that's actually very comforting and very reassuring to kids. >> reporter: there are no rules on how to return a school to normal after such a heinous act. i
who picked up the call was found dead. abc's david wright brings us this look at the dark side of practical jokes. >> hello, good morning. >> oh, hello there. could i please speak to kate, please, my granddaughter. >> oh, yes, just hold on. >> reporter: as this prank phone call by two australian djs went viral around the world. >> if this has worked, it's the easiest prank call we've ever made. >> reporter: one can only imagine that the nurse that put the call through must have been mortified. >> it is with deep sadness that i can confirm the tragic death of a member of our nursing staff, jacintha saldanha. everyone is shocked by the loss of a much-loved and valued colleague. >> reporter: today, the duke and duchess of cambridge echoed that sentiment. their royal highnesses were l k looked after so wonderfully well at all times. their thoughts and prayers are with jacintha saldanha's family, friends and colleagues at this very sad time. >> hello, i'm just after my granddaughter kate. >> reporter: suddenly, that joke at the expense of kate's care givers. >> when is a good time
. one of the greatest treasure hunts in human history. christiane amanpour takes us on a journey in search of the lost art. >>> bette and billy. tonight, holcolywood comedy ico talk about teaming up on screen for the first time. >> i'm going to start a fire. >> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," december 27th, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm terry moran. this year's holiday gift giving frenzy is drawing to a close. for many of us, that means this season's spending remorse is sinking in. the average american spent an estimated $700 during the holidays this year, so tonight, we wanted to bring you an inside look at the bargain stores that could help out with your wallet rehab. abc's ryan owens brings us inside the booming business of being cheap. >> reporter: they're opening their doors faster than new starbucks. >> i like it because it's cheaper. >> reporter: there are now more dollar stores in the united states than drugstores. >> since the prices are so good, it's like why not? >> you can ge
canine companions are sure to follow. tonight, the palace dog whisperer shows us how he keeps the royal kennel in line. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, bill weir, and tonight, juju chang in new york city, this is "nightline," december 6th, 2012. >> good evening, i'm juju chang. tonight, the newly released tapes granting an astonishing look at the twisted mind of a serial kilack the from jack the ripper to john wayne gave see, murders who seem to chose their victims at random fascinate and terrify us. it was the disappearance of an 18-year-old alaskan girl that led to police unravel one such killer's astounding 11-year killing spree. neal karlinsky brings us the chilling details for our series, "crime and punishment." >> reporter: you're watching 34-year-old israel keyes describe over coffee and a bagel his strategy for hunting and killing innocent people. >> back when i was smart, i would let them come to me. just a remote area. kind of go to a remote area that's not anywhere near where you live. but that other people go to, as we
's channel 9 tv, offering a tearful apology. >> the entertainment value wasn't us, it was meant to be in our silly accents, that's where it was meant to end. >> reporter: but it didn't end there. instead it ended in tragedy with the apparent suicide of a nurse who became the butt of a royal hoax heard around the world. these shock jocks were themselves shocked. >> shattered, gutted, heartbroken and obviously, you know, our deepest sympathies are with the family and friends. >> not a minute goes by that we don't think about the family and what they must be going through and the thought we may have played a part in that is -- g gut-wrenching. >> who's to think. we've been handed a phone number, all right? we have been told that this phone number is the hospital where kate middleton is currently staying. >> reporter: just last week, it was all laughs for michael and mel when they called up the london hospital where kate middleton was recovering from severe morning sickness. pretending to be queen lit beth and prince charles. >> hello there, may i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >
is drawing to a close. for many of us, that means this season's spending remorse is sinking in. the average american spent an estimated $700 during the holidays this year, so tonight, we wanted to bring you an inside look at the bargain stores that could help out with your wallet rehab. abc's ryan owens brings us inside the booming business of being cheap. >> reporter: they're opening their doors faster than new starbucks. >> i like it because it's cheaper. >> reporter: there are now more dollar stores in the united states than drugstores. >> since the prices are so good, it's like why not? >> you can get more stuff for cheaper. >> reporter: a $56 billion industry. >> i think we can double the size of our chain within this country. >> reporter: each pin on this map represents one family dollar store. howard levine is the ceo of that chain. >> tons of growth here. this is probably a thousand-store state. >> reporter: right now he oversees an empire of how many stores? >> right around 7,550. >> reporter: are you sensitive to the charge that you're the ceo of one of the cheap stores? cheap is
was, you know, she's watching us and she knows how hard this must be for us. and she wants to know how much she loved us and knows how much she was loved. >> reporter: others are telling harrowing stories of survival. >> they were sitting there. they were sitting there. i had no idea why they were there. >> reporter: a neighbor found six children at the end of his driveway and took them in. they were in vicky soto's first grade class. >> the boys were saying we can't go back to school. we can want go back to school. our teacher's dead. pl mrs. soto. we don't have a teacher. >> reporter: the counsellor crouched under her desk. >> you see the feet of the shooter? >> i could see him from the knees down. >> right in front of you? >> 20 feet away facing his feet. his boots were facing my desk. >> and he turned and walked away. >> seconds and turned and walked out. >> reporter: schools in five states including in ridgefield, connecticut on lockdown due to heightened suspicions as districts fast track new security plans. >> in lockdown mode until you hear an all clear announcement. >> reporte
that door, so we thought he had followed us down there and then we let her in and she said she saw a guy laying there dead with a gun beside him and we heard a gunshot before that. >> reporter: for law enforcement, a nightmare scenario. a shooting rampage in a mall packed with christmas shoppers. and because it was late afternoon, there were dozens of kids there hoping to see santa and there were also reports that there was a christmas concert under way right in the vicinity of the shooting. >> the idea that you can walk into a mall or any other location, a movie theater and shoot people is very intoxicating for these people, and they'd love to be able to control life and death. >> reporter: authorities have so far not identified the shooter or discussed any possible motive, but this incident now joins a grizzly list of other senseless shootings. this year alone, 12 people killed, 58 wounded at this aurora, colorado, movieplex in july. six people called at this wisconsin sikh temple. now add to that this shopping mall. >> i believe people will be more reticent to go to a mall just becaus
they operate. they have stifled meaningful discussion by using fear and intimidation tactics to keep people from saying the things that maybe need to be said. >> our thanks to terry moran. >>> next up, the man who says the nra is not as powerful as you might think. new york city mayor michael bloomberg on his campaign to demand a plan from president obama. so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. ♪ first rule of taking the world by surprise? do something the world will actually notice. introducing the entirely new ford fusion. with a turbo-charged ecoboost engines and a hybrid that doubles the fuel economy of the average vehicle. it's an entirely new idea of what a car can be. [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein i
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'm not the one who shot him. i wouldn't hurt him. >> then who did, deedee? tell us. >> reporter: moore's maintained all along she's innocent. but the 40-year-old is now charged with first-degree murder, facing a mandatory sentence of life in prison. prosecutors paint a picture of moore as a conniving manipulator. intent on taking shakespeare's cash. first, she tried to convince shakespeare's mother, elizabeth walker, that her son was still alive. just missing. orchestrating a phone call with someone claiming to be her son. >> he said, it's abraham. and i said, you don't sound like abraham. >> reporter: then, her ex-husband, james, testified he dug a hole with a backhoe and covered it up at his former wife's request. >> pay attention to what was in the hole? >> no, sir. >> before you filled it? >> no, sir. >> reporter: but the prosecution's star witness is greg smith, turned police informant. in secretly taped conversations, moore is heard spinning an elaborate web of lies. yesterday, smith describes the pains moore allegedly took to write a letter to shakespeare's mother, as if it was
, told us today they will not comment on pending lawsuits, but one of the show's producers did say this recently. >> i can honestly tell you that the stuff found in those containers are found in the storage containers. >> reporter: although he did admit they sometimes move items from one storage locker to another. this is not the first time the level of reality in reality tv has been questioned. recently, a former participant on hgtv's requests house hunters," which follows families choosing a new home, said producers knew she and her husband had already purchased their new home before they taped the show in 2006. >> finally the producer said let's do whatever. so we called our very closest and kindest friends who were that generous and they offered up their houses for us to tour as our pretend decision making houses. >> reporter: in a statement, hgtv said we aren't showing a documentary, we're simply entertaining our viewers. >> reality tv is a little bit like sausage. you might love the way it tastes but you don't necessarily want to know how it's made. >> reporter: clearly, most
's shoulders. and then our teacher held the first person's hand and she led us out. >> reporter: parents were alerted by text message in a frantic parade of them arrived at the fire station hoping to find their children alive. >> heartbreaking. it's heartbreaking. i mean, i don't -- when i heard, i -- i started crying. >> reporter: alexis' parents were among the lucky. her mom said when she arrived at the firehouse, alexis was already with her father. >> he had her in his arms. and crying. and so she is just, she goes mom, i'm okay, i'm here. >> reporter: the rampage and evacuation happened in a flash. but we wouldn't know the full scope of the horror for hours. >> the shooter is deceased. deceased in the school. >> reporter: by 10:30, president obama was briefed on the situation and schools throughout the area were on lockdown. police were surrounding a second crime scene, the shooter's mother's home, nearby. at around noon, the horrifying numbers were announced. abc news learned that lanza had killed 27 people. most of them children. at the local hospital, they were bracing for an onslaught
sweet. >> reporter: in an interview with abc news, the shooter's ex-girlfriend told us she has no idea what triggered the sudden and brutal attack. >> that's what is so mind boggling, because it is -- that was not the person i knew. and the person i knew would never, ever have done anything like this. >> reporter: but there was something strange in recent weeks. he says he seemed numb when she saw him last week, but she didn't think much of it. and she says he suddenly quit his job at a greek deli and sold all of his belongings, telling her he was leaving portland and moving to hawaii this past weekend. >> he had his plane ticket. he was ready to go. and then this happened, and it just makes me think why it was even in the back of his mind or if he just had another plan to leave. >> reporter: instead of hawaii, police say he went to the mall dressed to kill. police say roberts made a beeline from his volkswagen jetta in the parking lot through the macy's store carrying a rifle, wearing a ballistics vest, and a hockey style facemask. he entered on the upper level, when he got to the foo
new book. he showed us his brain scan. >> it was no it leaving any part of my cortex unaffected. >> reporter: so your conclusion is because all of this outer area which is the higher functioning was covered with the infection, what you experienced in the coma wasn't part of the brain? >> right. >> reporter: many neuroscientists are kept couple arguing that his brain must have produced his visions somehow, most likely as he came out of coma. but something else happened. after he recovered, eben, who was adopted saw a picture of a sister from his biological family who died years ago, a woman he never knew. >> and i knew who my guardian angel was on the butterfly wing. it was the most profound experience i've ever had in this life. >> your sister by birth and from a family that you didn't know because you were adopted who died several years ago, who you had never met, you saw while you were in coma? >> yes. and that was the key. that explained everything. >> reporter: dinner time at the alexander home. they were not a particularly religious family before eben's coma. he was a skept
of the expensive airport frenzy at the holidays, your travel dollar might not feel like it goes as far as it used to, but tonight you're going to meet some everyday travelers who found ways to fly literally around the world in first class luxury for next to nothing. that sounds too good to be true? maybe it's because you've never seen the extreme measures these folks are willing to rack up frequent flier miles. here's an encore presentation. >> reporter: this is where rick gets to go practically for free whenever he goes flying. to the front of the lie at the check-in counter. to the first class lounge. to seats like these at the front of the airplane, first class and business class. and the places he and his wife have gone together, such as -- >> we've gone from savannah to athens and then flew over to croatia, spent some time there. then up to split, also in croatia. then to amsterdam and back all in business class. >> total cost, just the taxes, $60 each, plus 120,000 frequent flier miles each, which sounds high, but not when you're what rick is, a frequent flier millionaire, one who wants to
are everything to us. and when that alarm sounds they all go. >>> new tonight, a man is dead and shot this morning after police say he tried to break into a business there. cheryl conner has more. >> reporter: investigators are processing the scene and an employee was inside the business when it happened. byron phillip broke in, a fight broke out and he was shot. county police were on the scene all day. it is in a neighborhood that is lit up and the business has an apartment attached to the back. the store employee who shot the man is working with the police and no charges has been filed. >>> the crash on the capital beltway we brought to you last night has claimed two lives. three cars crashed and it started when one driver lost control and slid into another car. the names of the victims who died have not been released. >>> it has been less than two-weeks since the shooting at sandy hook elementary school claimed the lives of 20 children and six adults. 26 candles were lit and many people are turning to their faith to get them through this difficult time. >> our hearts are broken in
to be curious. abc's david wright brings us america's newest overnight millionaires. >> reporter: at a gas station in maryland, a mystery man checks his numbers and then dances a jig. could it be the powerball shuffle? >> he says, is this the right numbers? i said, yeah, man, you got them all. >> reporter: in a small town in missouri, at the high school where they first fell in love, cindy and mark hill today insisted that huge check won't change their lives all that much. >> we will still be going down to the corner cafe for breakfast or fish day, i can guarantee you that. we're as common as anybody. we just have a little bit more money. >> reporter: make that a lot more money. and it's probably wishful thinking. already, their neighbors in this town of 496 people can't help but see them differently. >> i'm living in a wealthy neighborhood now. >> reporter: they all say they're happy for them. >> life just got a little bit easier for them. especially in these hard times. >> reporter: cindy hill had been laid off from her job two years ago. she was scheduled for a job interview the morning
? >> well, that's part of the challenge with cell phones these days. because it used to be -- >> pick up your phone and call, mr. obama, it's x, may i speak to your daughter. those days are gone. >> will you let malia date yet? >> she's a teenager and she's going to start at some point. being interested. >> our goal has been to try to make sure that their lives here are as normal as they can be. >> whatever they could do in chicago, they should be able to do here. >>> and when we come back -- what keeps you up at night? excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? geico. just click away with our free mobile app. [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette you celebrate a little win. nicorette gum helps calm your cr
across the nation. night after night. >> shot twice in the face, once in the back. they can't give us a definite. it's very serious. he's extremely critical and he's in the trauma bay and they're doing everything they can for him. >> sergeant hoyt knows his night is just beginning, and it would be the night of the sound of gunfire popping over and over and over again. meanwhile, in chicago, pete begins his overnight shift in the newsroom, waiting for police scans to begin their predictable cry. >> reporter: there's more than 2,400 shootings so far this year and there's still two weeks left. >> covering this beat means you will see more killed in cook county than the battlefield of afghanistan. >> reporter: shot in the back and the arm a couple times. >> the location is ominous. >> reporter: i don't know if kids are on christmas break or whatever, but they're going to find out somebody got shot next to their elementary school. >> he finds evidence markers. the victim scooped into a car and driven off. >> reporter: they're going to transfer him to a trauma center. >> waiting there are t
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)